POL S 460 A: Political Economy Of The European Union

Meeting Time: 
TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
Location: 
SAV 157
SLN: 
18670
Joint Sections: 
JSIS 488 B
Instructor:
James A. Caporaso

Syllabus Description:

           

 

 

Political Science 460/488

Spring 2017, Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30-3:20

Smith 307

Prof. James A. Caporaso

Office: Gowen 144                                  

University of Washington                                                 

caporaso@u.washington.edu                                            

 Office Hours Wednesday 1-3                                                                   

 

                                          

THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF THE EUROPEAN UNION

 

           

 

This course focuses on the political economy of the European Union (EU). There are three main emphases: (1) the theory of European integration; (2) the key, epoch-making events (Rome Treaty, the Single European Act, Maastricht and monetary union, the financial crisis, Brexit); and (3) the intensive examination of particular policies and issues (e.g. monetary policy, refugee policy). The EU is a rapidly moving target.  In 1958 there were six members, by 1986 there were twelve members; then fifteen, and today there are twenty-eight, soon to be twenty-seven with the UK departure. While this creates some difficulties (e.g. the rules change with new members), it also provides an opportunity to study the clash of interests and ideas within a rapidly changing political and economic environment. During the past several years, the foundations of the European Union and the Economic and Monetary Union have been challenged.  A major member state is in process of exiting the EU (Brexit), and the EU’s institutions are under severe stress from the refugee crisis and the rise of populist parties in Finland, Germany, France, Italy, and Spain, among others. The course will provide an opportunity to examine some of the challenges that the EU faces in real time.

 

 

Readings

 

I have ordered two books from the University Bookstore. (1) Desmond Dinan; Ever Closer Union, fourth edition, 2010; and (2) Robert Kagan, Of Paradise and Power, 2004. Reading assignments that are not in these books are either available in a reader at

EZ Copy N Print, 4336 University Way NE, print@ezcopy.net or on Canvas under either political science 460 or political science 488. Be sure to purchase the reader along with the books. These readings are absolutely essential for the course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Structure, Requirements, and Evaluations.

 

           

            The size of this class is limited to around twenty students, allowing it to be run as a combination of lecture and discussion group. I will use part of the class to present lecture material.  This will be a mix of factual material (e.g. on the institutional structure or history of the EU) and theoretical approaches (e.g., alternative explanations for integration and policymaking at the European level).  The material on the EU’s institutions is complex because the EU is complex. The fact that the EU is an UPO (unidentified political object) makes it hard to understand since there is no exact replica of the EU at the national level, i.e. it is not exactly parallel to any existing federal system such as the US or Germany nor is it in the same category as most intergovernmental organizations, such as the United Nations. The European Union is a distinctive political system, with its own rules and procedures. Just as we would have to understand the basic institutional structure of the US or France if we studied these countries, we need to grasp the basic structure of the EU before we can understand the dynamics of politics at the supranational level.

 

            The requirements of the course are (1) regular participation in class discussions, implying class attendance; (2) completion of reading assignments; and (3) taking a series of exams.  The exams will be a combination of essays designed to assess your overall comprehension of the course material along with shorter exercises that will test your mastery of the detailed subject matter. Absences in excess of three imply inadequate class participation.  Class participation will count for 20 percent of your final grade, the two mid-terms will count 20% each and the final will be worth 40%.   Please note my remarks above about the importance of class discussion. Finally, please do not miss the exams.  Enrollment in the class implies that you have no conflicts with the exam dates and will be here for the exams. Only a written excuse from your doctor will be accepted for a makeup exam.

 

 

                             first exam    (Thursday, April 20)          20%              

                             second exam   (Tuesday, May 16)          20%   

                             final Exam   (June 9, 2:30-4:20)            40%                 

                      Class participation                                 20%

 

 

A Word on Method of Instruction

 

Our class will be run as a combination of lecture and discussion. The EU will be new to many in the class so I will present some basic factual material.  However, this material is best learned in a critical and interactive way, that is, with intense discussion and critical analysis.  I anticipate lecture-discussion-lecture and so on in a Socratic back-and-forth manner.  I will use overheads rather than power-points in an effort to provide the broad outlines of the points to be covered without filling in all the details and interpretations.  That is for you to do during the class sessions. I will post the outlines on Canvas so that you can study them before class. It is a good idea to print out the overheads before coming to class and use them as an outline for taking notes. When there is a lot of factual material, I will either send you additional hand-outs electronically or post them on Canvas.

 

Class Rules of the Road. Please do not have cell phones, smart phones, cameras, recording devices or other similar “equipment” in class.  If you prefer to take notes on your computer, you may do so but PLEASE, use your computer only for note-taking. 

 

 

Schedule of Classes and Readings.* The reader is available at EZ Copy N Print, 4336 University Way NE. The books are at UW Book store.  Some of the readings will be posted on Canvas along with weekly terms to review.

 

Week 1 (March 28, 30) What is the European Union and Why Should We Care?

 

Readings

 

Timothy Garton Ash, “What Europe Can Be”, from Garton Ash, Free World, pp. 190-203. (reader)

 

Mark Leonard, Why Europe Will Run the 21st Century, pp. 1-28. (Canvas)

 

Alan Cowell and N. Kulish, “Nobel Committee Gives Peace Prize to EU”, New York Times, Oct. 12, 2012, pp. 1-4. (reader)

 

Connolly and Tran, “Nobel Peace Prize: Ten Things the EU has Done for US”, The Guardian (reader).

 

Schuman Declaration, “Declaration of 9 May 1950”, Europa, pp. 1-2 (reader).

 

Additional Readings (for historical background)

Desmond Dinan, Ever Closer Union. Boulder, Co.:LRP, 2010, Chapters 1 and 2.

 

 

 

Week 2 (April 4, 6) Institutions: Rules of the Game

 

Readings

Desmond Dinan, Ever Closer Union, chapters 7-11

 

Alberta Sbragia, "The EC: A Balancing Act", Publius, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 23-42 (reader).

 

 

 

Week 3 (April 11, No class on April 13) Theoretical Perspectives:Functionalism, Neo-functionalism, and historical institutionalism

 

Readings

Ben Rosamond (2000) Theories of European Integration, pp. 31-42 and 50-68. (Canvas).

 

Walter Mattli (1999). The Logic of Regional Integration, pp. 41-50. (Canvas).

 

Paul Pierson, "The Path to European Integration", Comparative Political Studies, vol. 29, no. 2 (April 1996), pages 123-163(reader).

 

Frank Schimmelfennig, European Integration in the Euro Crisis: the Limits of Post-Functionalism”, Journal of European Integration, vol. 36, issue 3, pp.321-337 (Canvas)

 

 

 

Week 4 (April 18, 20) Theoretical Perspectives: State-Centric Theories and intergovernmentalism (First exam, April 20)

 

Readings

Ben Rosamond (2000). Theories of European Integration, pp. 130-145. (Canvas).

 

Daniela Schwarzer, (2012) The euro area crisis: shifting power relations and institutional change in the European Union”, Global Policy, 3 (s1), pp. 28-41 (Canvas).

 

 

 

Week 5 (April 25,27) Member States, National Interests, and European Identity

 

 

Readings

Timothy Garton Ash, “Germany’s Choice”, Foreign Affairs, July/August 1994, vol. 73, no. 4. (reader).

 

Maxime Lefebvre, “France and Europe: an Ambivalent Relationship”, Brookings Institution, pp. 1-6 (Canvas)

 

James Ellison, “Is Britain More European than it Thinks?”, History Today, vol. 62,no. 2 (2012), pp. 1-4. (Canvas).

 

Wolfgang Proissl, “Why Germany Fell out of Love with Europe”, Bruegel Essay and Lecture Series, pp. 5-46. (Canvas)

 

Economist “The European Union: Family Frictions”. (reader)

 

 

Week 6 (May 2,4) The Single European Act

No Class May 4

Readings

Andrew Moravcsik, “Negotiating the Single European Act,” in Keohane and Hoffmann (eds.), The New European Community, pp. 41-84 (reader).

 

Desmond Dinan, Ever Closer Union, chapters 4 and 13 (pp. 391-412).

 

 

Week 7 (May 9,11) Maastricht and European Monetary Union

 

Readings

Wayne Sandholtz, “Choosing Union: Monetary Politics and Maastricht”, International Organization, vol. 47, no. 1 (Winter 1993). (reader).

 

Desmond Dinan, Ever Closer Union, chapter 15.

 

  1. Berman and K. McNamara, “Bank on Democracy”, Foreign Affairs, March 1999, pp. 1-6 (reader).

 

Week 8 (May 16,18) The European Financial Crisis

 

SECOND EXAM, TUESDAY May 16

Readings

Benedicta Marzinotto et al., “Two Crises, Two Responses”, Bruegel policy brief, March 2010,  pp. 1-8. (Canvas).

 

Paul DeGrauwe, “Only a More Active ECB can solve the Euro Crisis”, CEPS Policy Brief, August 2011, pp. 1-6. (Canvas).

 

Randall Henning and Martin Kessler,   “Fiscal Federalism: US History for Architects of Europe’s Fiscal Union”, 2012, Bruegel Essay and Lecture Series, pp. 5-40. (Canvas).

 

Stefano Micossi, “The Eurozone in bad need of a psychiatrist”, Europe Commentary, No. 6, December 2010, pp. 1-2. (Canvas).

 

Week 9 (May 23,25) External Relations and Transatlantic Tensions

Readings

Robert Kagan, Of Paradise and Power:America and Europe in the New World Order, Vintage Books, 2004, all.

 

 

 

Week 10 (May 30, June 1)Brexit and the Refugee Crisis:Will the EU Fall Apart?

 

Readings

 

BBC New, “Brexit: all You Need to Know about UK leaving the EU”,

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-32810887

 

Jim Yardley, “Has Europe Reached the Breaking Point”, NYT, December 15, 2015. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/20/magazine/has-europe-reached-the-breaking-point.html

 

Carl Bildt, “A Happy New Year for Europe”, Project Syndicate, December 28, 2015, pp. 1-4. (reader)

 

David Held and Kyle McNally, “To Be or Not to Be: Europe Under Siege”, Social Europe, December 2015, pp. 1-6. (reader)

 

Hollifield, “The Refugee Crisis in Europe and the Policy Response”. Pp. 1-18 (Canvas)

 

Final exam: June 9, 2:30-4:20 Smith 307

Additional Details:

 

This course focuses on the political economy of the European Union (EU). There are three main emphases: (1) the theory of European integration; (2) the key, epoch-making events (Rome Treaty, the Single European Act, Maastricht and monetary union, the financial crisis, Brexit); and (3) the intensive examination of particular policies and issues (e.g. monetary policy, refugee policy). The EU is a rapidly moving target.  In 1958 there were six members, by 1986 there were twelve members; then fifteen, and today there are twenty-eight. While this creates some difficulties (e.g. the rules change with new members), it also provides an opportunity to study the clash of interests and ideas within a rapidly changing political and economic environment. During the past two years, the foundations of the European Union and the Economic and Monetary Union have been challenged.  The course will provide an opportunity to examine some of the challenges that the EU faces in real time.

Catalog Description: 
Historical foundation of the European Economic Community; major phases of its development; theoretical explanations for European integration.
Department Requirements: 
Political Economy Option
International Relations Field
GE Requirements: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
November 14, 2017 - 9:25pm