Summer & Autumn courses in American Indian Studies: DIV, I&S, VLPA

We still have space available in many AIS classes. All students are welcome in our classes, most of which are Areas of Knowledge courses. 

SUMMER 2016

AIS 202: Introduction to Contemporary Experience in Indian America

5 credits I&S, DIV
A-term, MTuWTh 1:50 - 4:00 pm
Instructor: Daniel Hart
Survey of contemporary Native American people, cultures, and issues. Focus on modern experiences through readings from Native-American autobiographies, contemporary narratives and literature, and reports of important topical issues, e.g., water rights, Indian gaming, treaty law.

AIS 340: The Health and Wealth of Native Nations (Catalog: American Indian Children & Families)

5 credits I&S, DIV
A-term, MTuWTh 11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Instructor: Dian Million
In this class we seek insight into the experiences of North American Indian families from several different perspectives, and foremost, those of American Indian families themselves. The instructor takes a socio-historical approach in presenting the traditional and future strengths of tribal families to protect and nourish their children. The class focuses on their challenges but is also focused on the solutions that American Indian peoples have sought. Topics include: 20th-21st century American Indian family demographics, studies of traditional family structures, western nation-state interventions such as boarding school and social science and social welfare management. It also discusses in particular Indian Child Welfare practices in the United States and some comparison of programs and issues in Canada.

AIS 360: American Indians in Cinema

5 credits VLPA/I&S, DIV
A-term, MTuWTh 10:20 am - 12:30 pm
Instructor: Tom Colonnese
Studies representations of American Indians in American films from 1900 to present. Examines the foundations of American Indian stereotypes and how Hollywood helped create and perpetuate those stereotypes. Activities include reading critical materials, and viewing, discussing, and writing critically about films by non-Native directors.
 

AIS 475: Tribal Canoe Journey Field Study

5 credits I&S, NW (for NW email elissaw@uw.edu)
B-term, on campus 7/21-7/27 and field study 7/29-8/6
Instructor: Cynthia Updegrave
Details: http://bit.ly/237nMaV

Students participate in activities associated with the hosting of the Annual Tribal Canoe Journey at Nisqually. Camping facilities and most meals are provided by the host.  Learning is focused on the ecology of the Salish Sea, Coast Salish culture, the many and continuing impacts of settlement to the ecosystems and culture, and the Annual Tribal Canoe Journey.  This event has grown from a few canoes to over a hundred, and thousands of people participating annually. Tribal Canoe Journey is creating cultural renewal across the region.
 
The course will begin on campus and provide an interdisciplinary academic framework based on praxis, preparing ourselves to use theory, practice, and reflection as a learning method, before we organize ourselves to travel and camp at the event. Once there, our day will be centered in daily service, and building a learning community informed by the Ten Rules of the Canoe. Our learning methods are experiential and service-based, and dependent on personal and group reflection. Gifting is an integral part of the event;  we will prepare in advance to give gifts to our hosts.

AUTUMN 2016

AIS 102: Survey of American Indian Studies

5 credits I&S, DIV
TuTh 11:30 am - 1:20 pm
Instructor: Christopher Teuton
This course provides an introduction to American Indian and Indigenous Studies, a field of academic research and teaching grounded in  the interdisciplinary study of American Indian and Indigenous peoples with the collective goal of fostering individual and community wellness, political self-determination, cultural revitalization, and cross-cultural understanding.

AIS 360: American Indians in Cinema

5 credits VLPA/I&S, DIV
TuTh 10:30 am - 12:20 pm
Instructor TBA
Studies representations of American Indians in American films from 1900 to present. Examines the foundations of American Indian stereotypes and how Hollywood helped create and perpetuate those stereotypes. Activities include reading critical materials, and viewing, discussing, and writing critically about films by non-Native directors.

AIS 378: Contemporary American Indian Literature: A Northwest Focus

5 credits VLPA
MW 11:30 am - 1:20 pm
Instructor: Dian Million
Memory, land and the magic of language deeply intertwine with life in the Native communities of the Pacific North and Northwest. American Indian literature attends to a particular experience in North America. While contemporary American Indian literatures are not synonymous with any oral traditions that inform them, they honor those traditions.
Contemporary Native literatures have sprung up like new growth after a forest fire. While some of the featured writers draw from older traditions, others show extensive global influences and write exclusively for the text. We will read, discuss and analyze a variety of literatures from traditional oral storytelling transposed into written form to contemporary hybrid forms like spoken word, rap and hip-hop. We will contemplate, discuss and write about the issues of race, gender and nationalism that these writers grappled with as they created creative and critical space through their works.
 
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